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kiransingh:

the only domestic instinct my parents have managed to pass on to me is the tendency to hoard multiple plastic bags in another plastic bags despite the fact that I will probably never need this many plastic bags in my adult life

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#sophie turner #wow #get out
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#les amours imaginaires #sh
morrigan-disapproves: "hiii i rly love ur post of ancient gay book recs, i was just wondering if there are any w gay ladies in? or academic stuff you would rec abt ancient gay ladies? i have jstor access atm"

argonauticae:

argonauticae:

hey! yesss ive been silently hoping someone would ask me this, i can TOTALLY do this (altho advance warning ancient gay ladies fiction is extremely thin on the ground :/) i’m actually about to get kicked out of here bc my boss says i need to go home to like eat and stuff, but im publishing this so i don’t forget about it (if i do someone yell at me please) and i’ll reblog with recs asap

(i FINALLY got around to doing this, sorry for being a massive failure guys)

so fairly typically, novels about lesbians in the ancient world are p thin on the ground and are mostly about sappho (just as general sort of resource, this website is pretty great - like ten thousand historical novels sorted by time period). the two i have on my amazon wishlist right now are sappho’s leap by erica jong, which looks promising, and the laughter of aphrodite by peter green, about which i am more sceptical

for academic stuff, the problem i generally find is that (partially bc erasure/prejudice/PATRIARCHY! and partly bc lack of original evidence/sources) there aren’t many academic texts solely looking at female/female relationships? what you’re much more likely to find are a) books about sappho and by extension f/f relationships or b) chapters/sections about f/f relationships in larger texts about ancient sexuality in general. so THAT SAID, i like these books:

anda couple from JSTOR:

hopefully all the links work - if any of them are broken, let me know!

posted 1 day ago with 187 notes , via , source - reblog
#les miserables

italianformygirlfriend:

662: Ronzio

posted 1 day ago with 44 notes , via , source - reblog
#illustration #bees

penthesileas:

LITERATURE MEME - nine poems: “ozymandias” by percy bysshe shelley [7/9]

Title: UnknownPacific Rim
Artist: UnknownRamin Djawadi
Album: Unknown
Played: 261529 times
posted 1 day ago with 26,198 notes , via , source - reblog
#music #pacific rim

Summer Sketchbook + Hungarian Horntail

posted 3 days ago with 100 notes , via - reblog
#harry potter #fan art #DRAGON

Francois & … 'J’ai tué ma mère' director Xavier Dolan:

- My name is Xavier Dolan and I have a role I would like to offer you in my first film. Would you like to come for a coffee with me? - No.

François Arnaud laughs while describing the anecdote in a café in Outrement. “Xavier looked about 12 years old. I didn’t know who he was or what he wanted from me, so yes it’s true, I refused to go for a coffee with him.” The story could have stopped there, but along with Xavier Dolan’s stubborness and François Arnaud’s intuition, a few days later François received the script for J’ai tué ma mère. “When I read Xavier’s script, I wanted to launch into it straight away. It was original, well written, trippy (…) As for the rest, I said to myself that if ever this film got made, only around 45 people would go and see it. I didn’t imagine the encredible buzz that would arise around this film.” [x]

pilferingapples:

Many many Agos I decided to make a playlist for every single actual Amis moment in the book. This is the first half of that, going from the introductions through 1830, with bonus music for the July Revolt they almost won.

So here, everyone, have a ridiculously overthought playlist in honor of The Time Not Everyone Died!

Track listing is on the image, but also below the cut for anyone who’d rather read plain text!

Read More

posted 3 days ago with 153 notes , via - reblog

Chivalry in later ages may have had merits, but in the 11th century it was a social disaster. It produced a superfluity of conceited illiterate young men who had no ideals except to ride and hunt and fight, whose only interest in life was violence and the glory they saw in it. They were no good at anything else, and despised any peaceful occupation. —David Howarth. 1066 the year of the conquest (via greasequeen)

posted 3 days ago with 254 notes , via , source - reblog
#history #lmao
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